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Lucille Joullin

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Start/Birth date: 1876
Death/End date: 1924

Born in Genesco, IL on Sept. 6, 1876, "Lou" Wilcox was the pupil of John Vanderpoel at the AIC before settling in San Francisco in 1894. She had further study at the Mark Hopkins Institute under Arthur Mathews and Amédée Joullin. She was married briefly at the turn of the century to artist Jules Mersfelder; however, the marriage failed, whereupon she wed Amédée Joullin in 1907.

During 1907 she worked as a designer for Globe Wallpaper in Seattle before leaving on an extended honeymoon in Paris. After returning to San Francisco in 1909, she established a home and studio. She taught at Mills College in Oakland in 1917-18 and, about this time, did a series of paintings of Golden Gate Park.

After the death of her second husband in 1917, she wed Edward Benjamin (brother of artist Ruth Benjamin) and again spent long periods in New Mexico. Except for the time in New Mexico and Paris, she lived in San Francisco until her demise on June 5, 1924.

Lucile Joullin is best known for her landscapes of northern California and depictions of the Pueblo Indians of New Mexico.
Lucile Wilcox Joullin (1876 - 1924)

Lucile Joullin was born in Geneseo, Illinois on August 7, 1876, studying art at sixteen years of age. From 1901-1904 she studied at the Chicago Art Institute, Illinois, and later at the California School of Design, San Francisco. Though well-known and respected for her paintings of Indians, Joullin was early recognized for "The Algerian Slave," exhibited in 1908 at the Paris Salon. Lucile Joullin is best known for her landscapes of northern California and depictions of the Pueblo Indians of New Mexico.

 

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