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Paul Dyck

Birth place or City of origin: Chicago
State of origin: IL
Last known City: Oak Creek
Last known State: AZ
Start/Birth date: 1917
Death/End date: 2006

A descendant of the Flemish painter, Sir Anthony Van Dyck (1599-1641), Paul Dyck was born in 1917 and has devoted his entire life to the study of the American Indian. His father's early years during the late 1880s, as a pioneer among the Blackfoot Indians of Western Canada, centuries of art traditions in the family, and an early boyhood apprenticeship in Florence, Italy, have led Paul Dyck through a life filled with art and the American Indian people.

As an initiate of the Buffalo Culture region, he has had the rare privilege of observing and studying the American Indian from the psychological and human viewpoint, rather than only from ethnological reports. He has been the adopted son of two noted Indian leaders: One Elk, a veteran of Chief Sitting Bull's band; and then of Lone Wolf, the famed Blackfoot artist.

Paul Dyck has been given the name Wi-'hun'ke E'ta'pa (Rainbow Hand) by the Sioux people and has lived among the Sioux, Cheyenne, Blackfoot, Crow, Otoe, Pawnee, Kiowa, Comanche, Zuni, Navajo, Hopi and Apache.

In his paintings, Paul Dyck uses two separate methods: the 14th-century Florentine technique and the ancient Japanese Sumiye technique to interpret the Buffalo Culture of the Indian.

From his ranch in Northern Arizona's Verde Valley where he lived and worked with his art and with the land for the past thirty-five years, Paul Dyck produced his first edition of original lithographs; illustrating vigor and eloquence with which he has expressed his mature vision in this new medium.

Biography courtesy of www.AskArt.com


A descendant of the Flemish painter, Sir Anthony Van Dyck (1599-1641), Paul Dyck was born in 1917 and has devoted his entire life to the study of the American Indian. His father's early years during the late 1880s, as a pioneer among the Blackfoot Indians of Western Canada, centuries of art traditions in the family, and an early boyhood apprenticeship in Florence, Italy, have led Paul Dyck through a life filled with art and the American Indian people. He died in March of 2006 in a nursing home, Sedona Winds, in Oak Creek near Sedona, Arizona.

 

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