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Alfredo Campos

Birth place or City of origin: Tucson
State of origin: AZ
Last known City:
Last known State: WA
Start/Birth date: 1935
Death/End date:

Unrivaled in the lost art of horsehair hitching, Alfredo Campos was born in Tucson, Arizona in 1935 on a cattle ranch. He moved to Washington in 1958 and worked for Boeing for 35 years. He learned to braid rawhide for his own ropes, then picked up the Barnett book on horsehair hitching in 1974 and taught himself to braid, a monumental feat! With his wife of 37 years, Lucia, he has 5 children and 9 grandchildren. His credo is "do the best you can" which is proven by the fact that any errors in his pieces are ripped out and re-worked until each attains the perfection he demands.

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Unrivaled in the lost art of horsehair hitching, Alfredo Campos was born in Tucson, Arizona in 1935 on a cattle ranch. He moved to Washington in 1958 and worked for Boeing for 35 years. He learned to braid rawhide for his own ropes, then picked up the Barnett book on horsehair hitching in 1974 and taught himself to braid, a monumental feat! In earlier days this art form was associated with prison life, to the extent that "making hair bridles" was synonymous with doing time behind bars. Campos points out that he has never been to prison, but he did study historic prison pieces in order to master the complex knots and designs. Through the years, Campos taught himself every step in the process of horsehair hitching, from gathering hair to dyeing it and then figuring out the designs he wants to make in the actual piece. "I have to know how I want it to look. Some designs I make out on a graph paper, though I don't always follow them in their entirety. I start them out. Hitching is kind of a mathematical process in that you have to work with strands that are divisible by the size of the design you select." Alfredo’s work is considered without peer

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Alfredo Campos was born November 19, 1935, outside Tucson, Arizona. As a young man, he was immersed in Western ranching life and skills. He was especially fascinated by the beautiful horse gear made from pieces of rawhide and had a special interest in braiding the reata, the traditional vaquero lariat. "I was born and raised on a ranch, and I always liked braided horse gear, like we used to rope cattle with,” he said. “I did that kind of work in Arizona and still on the ranch. My parents, Dolores and Alfredo Campos, always had a little ranch, but my father had to do construction work, and he farmed. There were 12 kids, and he had to earn a living at whatever he could find. But we always had cattle. Life was good on the ranch. There was always something to do. I enjoyed riding horses, training horses, and working with cattle. We did everything off of horseback. We had to rope the cattle and brand them and earmark them. We didn't even have a squeeze-chute."

In 1958, he went on vacation to visit his brother in Washington State and decided to move there with his wife. He got a job working for Boeing. "But then I was drafted," he recalled, "and by the time I got out of the Army I had two girls. And when I came out, I had a good job. When I first started, I actually worked in the assembly of the body section of the aircraft, and from there, went into another shop that actually made sheet metal parts for the airplane power brake. And then, I became a lead worker for 22 years. I had from 16 to 18 people working for me. And then I became a fixture maker, which involved sharpening tools and making tools for punching holes in metal."

Campos continued to do some rawhide work. "I took it back up," he said, "but Washington State is on the West Coast and kind of a wet state. So, rawhide isn't very popular there. I learned about a little book by a man named Eugene Barnett that talked about horsehair hitching in the early part of the century. Well, I bought the book, and it was very difficult for me to follow. So, I put the book away and I started trying to learn it on my own and did a pretty good job. Now, the book makes perfect sense. I can follow him very well, and my hitching is more like when hitching was done more. It kind of died out."

In earlier days this art form was associated with prison life, to the extent that "making hair bridles" was synonymous with doing time behind bars. Campos points out that he has never been to prison, but he did study historic prison pieces in order to master the complex knots and designs.

Through the years, Campos taught himself every step in the process of horsehair hitching, from gathering hair to dyeing it and then figuring out the designs he wants to make in the actual piece. "I have to know how I want it to look. Some designs I make out on a graph paper, though I don't always follow them in their entirety. I start them out. Hitching is kind of a mathematical process in that you have to work with strands that are divisible by the size of the design you select."

 

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