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    Picturing The West

Where are the Western Legends of the Silver Screen Now?

Museum of Western Film History in Lone Pine, CA
The Museum of Western Film History in Lone Pine, CA is the only museum in the world devoted entirely to chronicling western film history and its impact on American and cultures worldwide.

Lone Pine, CA — It didn’t take long after the invention of moving pictures for Hollywood to discover a spectacular location within a few hours’ drive. Since the early years of filmmaking, directors have used Lone Pine and the surrounding Alabama Hills as the backdrop of the iconic American West. The first documented feature film shot entirely on location in Lone Pine was The Roundup (1920), a silent Western starring Fatty Arbuckle in his first feature film which made good use of the incredible scenery near Lone Pine, with the weirdly eroded, jumbled rocks of the Alabama Hills backed by the snowcapped peaks of the Sierra Nevada Mountains.

And now, after almost 100 years, Lone Pine is still home to the Western legends of the silver screen, where their spectacular Hollywood history is preserved at the Museum of Western Film History. Set perfectly in the largest natural back lot, the legends come alive through the rich exhibits of the biggest stars such as John Wayne, Bing Crosby, Humphrey Bogart, Barbara Stanwyck, Jeff Bridges, Jamie Foxx, Spencer Tracey, Cary Grant, Gregory Peck, Randolph Scott, Audie Murphy and Robert Downey, Jr. to name a few.

Stage Coach

Nudies Car
The Museum showcases one the largest, most diverse and significant collections in the world.

From famous long running TV series like The Lone Ranger and Hopalong Cassidy to today’s blockbuster films such as Iron Man, this amazing museum takes you on a wild ride through 100 years of the Western Silver Screen.

The exhibits and collections are the finest in the world with original costumes, cars, props, posters and running films. The Museum was the life long dream of Beverly and Jim Rogers who wanted to create a permanent home that would pay tribute to America’s western heroes and heroines for the world to see. In 2006, the dream became a reality when the doors to the Museum of Western Film History opened its doors showcasing one the largest, most diverse and significant collections in the world. It is the only museum in the world devoted entirely to chronicling western film history and its impact on American and even global cultures.

Beyond the rich exhibits, ongoing special events, such as the Lone Pine Film Festival, keep the history alive and the dialogue current.

The last of the singing cowboys
The legends of the Western silver screen live on at the Museum of Western Film History.

Make the trip to the stunning Eastern Sierras where the legends come alive and the story continues. Indeed it’s fun, it’s enriching but even more than that, it’s important.

For more information, please visit: www.lonepinefilmhistorymuseum.org

—Jayne Skeff


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Mission Statement

Smoke Signals blows your way from High Noon Western Americana of Los Angeles, California, producers of the High Noon Antique Show & Auction for 25 years (1991-2014). Smoke Signals eMagazine was founded in 2010 from a desire to share thoughts and facts with the High Noon community and look at what is going on in the Western world while feeding our readers with great recipes and giving advertisers a chance to blow their own smoke.

And hopefully we educate along the way.

Linda Kohn Sherwood, Editor


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